by JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR, ISLAMiCommentary on DECEMBER 17, 2015: 

We at the Duke Islamic Studies Center are pleased to announce that the work of the Carnegie Corporation of New York-supported Transcultural Islam Project (ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN) has been highlighted in a new report by the Social Science Research Council — “Religion, Media and the Digital Turn.” The report surveyed 160 digital projects and documents the effects that digital modes of research and publication have on the study of religion.

“While our primary goal is to chronicle emerging forms of intellectual production shaping the study of religion, we hope that a greater awareness of this new work will generate more recognition of the high quality and innovative work that already exists,” report authors Chris Cantwell (University of Missouri) and Hussein Rashid (New York University) write, explaining that “the most innovative digital projects are often those that creatively combine a number of these models or genres.”

ISLAMiCommentary was mentioned at the top of several subsections, for this reason, and a lengthy case study of ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN has been included in the report (in Appendix 1) because, as the report authors told us, they find the project “exemplary.” Other projects highlighted with lengthy case studies (in Appendix 1) include the Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion (MAVCOR) at Yale, the Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project at the University of Loyola; and Mapping Ararat — a project of York University, the University of Toronto and Emerson College.

Appendix 2 lists the 160 projects surveyed.

The report can be downloaded HERE.

via SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM LISTSERV: 

These articles are freely available until 31 January 2015!*

Islamic Law in the Modern World
Author: Aharon Layish
Islamic Law and Society, (Volume 21, No. 3, pp. 276-307)

An Epistemic Shift in Islamic Law
Author: Aria Nakissa
Islamic Law and Society, (Volume 21, No. 3, pp. 209-251)

Reconstructing Archival Practices in Abbasid Baghdad
Author: Maaike van Berkel
Journal of Abbasid Studies, (Volume 1, No. 1, pp. 7-22)

The Early Ḥanafiyya and Kufa
Author: Christopher Melchert
Journal of Abbasid Studies, (Volume 1, No. 1, pp. 23-45)

The Prayers of Abū Muslim and al-Maʾmūn. An Exercise in Dating Ḥadīth
Author: Stijn Aerts
Journal of Abbasid Studies, (Volume 1, No. 1, pp. 66-83) Continue reading

via JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR, TIRN on AUGUST 13, 2014:

NewBooksIslamicStudiesCheck out the latest New Books in Islamic Studies reviews and associated audio interviews in podcast form! The following authors are featured:

 

SHABANA MIR, author of “Muslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity”
(University of North Carolina Press, 2014)

JOHN P. TURNER, author of “Inquisition in Early Islam: The Competition for Political and Religious Authority in the Abbasid Empire” (I.B. Tauris, 2013)

BRIAN A. CATLOS, author of “Muslims of Medieval Latin Christendom, c.1050-1614”
Cambridge University Press, 2014)

RACHEL RINALDO, author of “Mobilizing Piety: Islam and Feminism in Indonesia”
Oxford University Press, 2013)

J. MATTHIAS DETERMANN, author of “Historiography in Saudi Arabia: Globalization and the State in the Middle East” (Tauris, 2014)

See links HERE.