by JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN on JUNE 3, 2016: 

Our ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN web sites, managed out of the Duke Islamic Studies Center in partnership with the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations at UNC-Chapel Hill, will cease production on June 30, 2016, with the end of the grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York that has supported it since its beginning.

We would like to thank all of our contributors, readers and supporters. It has been a real pleasure being the editor!

Here are some compilations that have been running on ISLAMiCommentary this month: Continue reading

“The role of highly-skilled and educated young people in vulnerable communities is not often the focus of established humanitarian policies and programs. This neglect persists despite the fact that the stability of the Middle East-North Africa region, as well as the rebuilding of post-conflict Syria, depends on maintaining the human and intellectual capital these young people represent.” (“The War Follows Them: Syrian University Students & Scholars in Lebanon” – Keith Watenpaugh/Adrienne L. Fricke/James R. King/IIE / UC Davis)

compiled by JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR, ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN on JUNE 1, 2015: 

Keith Watenpaugh (Director of the University of California Davis Human Rights Center), spoke in April at Duke University on “Syria’s Lost Generation.” His presentation took place as part of Duke University’s Middle East Refugees Awareness Week, April 8-17, 2015 and was based on research he and colleagues conducted about Syrian university students and scholars (refugees) in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan.

“We know from some pre-war statistics which are shaky at best that about 18% of the Syrian population between the ages of 16 and 24 go to some kind of secondary training, (including) universities. More city people go to university than people from the countryside,” he said, leading off his talk.

As of the date of the talk in April there were about 4 million Syrian refugees. WATCH WATENPAUGH’S TALK ABOVE. Links and information about his research below. Continue reading

Posted in Education, Human Rights, Middle East & North Africa, MyTIRN, Uncategorized.

via CENTER FOR MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO on AUGUST 1, 2013: 

Job Opportunity: Arabic Instructor.

Wilbur Wright College in Chicago is looking for an instructor to teach an Arabic 101 course on Mondays from 2:00pm-5pm on the campus located at 4300 N. Narragansett Avenue, Chicago.

As for qualifications, the minimum requirement is a B.A. degree in any field, in addition to being proficient in Arabic with teaching experience.

For more information about this position or to apply, please contact Darlene Attiah, at darleneattiah@yahoo.com.

 

Posted in Americas, Job Posting, Language & Literature, Uncategorized.

by JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR, TIRN on DECEMBER 21, 2012:

The Transcultural Islam Research Network (TIRN) wishes you a wonderful holiday season, and thanks you for all of your support of this forum! New posts on this site will be limited (due to the academic holiday) between December 22, 2012 and January 1, 2013. Continue to follow us on Twitter during this period @TIRNScholars.

ABOUT TIRN

CALL for PANELS/PAPERS 

Conference: 8th Pan-European Conference on International Relations, September 18 -21, 2013, Warsaw, Poland

Section Title: “Critical Relations of International Relations and Islam”
Organizers: The European International Studies Association, Institute of International Relations (University of Warsaw), and the Polish Association for International Studies
Chairs: Nassef Manabilang Adiong and Dr. Adis Duderija (University of Malaya)
Deadline: February 8, 2013

For a very long time, the Muslim world was regarded as an outsider from the cultural and normative pretext and state relations of the West. Even during the reign of the Ottoman Empire, scholars of International Relations (IR) excluded her as a subordinated stealth ally or non-ally of major European powers.

The shift from Bush to Obama in their foreign policies toward the Muslim world, Imam Khamenei’s position about nuclear weapons, transitional political elites such as Egypt’s Pres. Morsi (Muslim Brotherhood) and Tunisia’s PM Jebali (Ennahda Movement), and Malaysia and Indonesia’s rising Salafi (political) movements are few examples that it is now apparent that there is an imperative motivation why Islamic discourses gradually dominate contemporary international relations, and how it affects the West in a theory-praxis spectrum.

Continue reading

Posted in Interdisciplinary, International Studies, Islamic Law, Islamic Studies & Academia, Uncategorized.