1,000 Years of Scientific Texts From The Islamic World Are Now Online
(courtesy IO9)

by MARK STRAUSS for IO9.COM on OCTOBER 28, 2014: 

Between the 9th and 19th centuries, Arabic-speaking scholars translated Greek, Latin and even Sanskrit texts on topics such as medicine, mathematics and astronomy, fostering a vibrant scientific culture within the Islamic world. Some of the most influential texts are now available at the Qatar Digital Library.

The library, a joint project of the British Library and the Qatar Foundation, offers free access to 25,000 pages of medieval Islamic manuscripts. Among some of the most significant texts:

The Book of Knowledge of Ingenious Mechanical Devices (1206 A.D.), which was inspired by an earlier, 9th-century translation of Archimedes’ writings on water clocks. Devices such as the “Elephant Clock” (pictured below) were the most accurate time-keeping pieces before the first pendulum clocks were built in the 17th century by the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens.

KEEP READING PLUS MORE PHOTOS FROM THE QATAR DIGITAL LIBARY

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by Nur Sobers-Khan for BRITISH LIBRARY  ASIAN & AFRICAN STUDIES  MAY 3, 2013

Matrakçı Nasuh’s Ümdet ül-Ḥisāb (Or. 7988) and Cāmi‘ üt-Tevārīh (Add. 23586)

New information about manuscripts in our collections is often made known through the work of dedicated experts who study specific items in the course of their research.  One such case was brought to light through the work of Dr. Hüseyin Gazi Yurdaydın, who successfully identified the author of one of the British Library’s Turkish manuscripts which had previously been described as anonymous (Yurdaydın, 144).  Continue reading

Via ROYAL COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS , MAY 1, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-05-01 at 4.52.52 PMThe mirror of health: discovering medicine in the golden age of Islam
An exhibition revealing the development of medical tradition in Europe and the Middle East from the collections of the Royal College of Physicians
May 1 thru  October 25, 2013

The Royal College of Physicians holds a rare collection of Islamic medical manuscripts dating from the 13th century. Continue reading

Via RBSC MANUSCRIPTS DIVISION BLOG, APRIL 19, 2013

 
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Cat­a­loging is now avail­able online for the entire col­lec­tion of the nearly 2200  man­u­scripts com­pris­ing the New Series of Islamic Man­u­scripts in the Man­u­scripts Divi­sion, Depart­ment of Rare Books and Spe­cial Col­lec­tions, Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity Library. The New Series con­sti­tutes the pre­mier col­lec­tion of pre­dom­i­nantly Shi‘ite man­u­scripts in the West­ern Hemi­sphere and among the finest in the world. The online records have been cre­ated as part of the Islamic Man­u­scripts Cat­a­loging and Dig­i­ti­za­tion Project, to improve access to these rich col­lec­tions and share them world­wide through dig­i­tal tech­nol­ogy. Gen­er­ous sup­port from the David A. Gard­ner ’69 Magic Project has funded this ongo­ing effort. Researchers can now locate Ara­bic, Per­sian, and Ottoman Turk­ish man­u­scripts by search­ing the Library’s online cat­a­log.

FULL POST 

Via THE BRITISH INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF IRAQ, on APRIL 12, 2013
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Without memory, how can we know who we are? This is the question that drives Dr Saad Eskander, LSE-trained historian and, since 2003, Director of the Iraqi National Library and Archives.Saad talks passionately of the imperative to locate, preserve and digitise as much as possible of Iraq’s documentation so that history will not just remember the oppressors but also the oppressed.

But Saad does not just talk: for the past decade he has also been putting those words into action in many different ways. The books lining his elegant office were once owned by the Iraqi royal family and then passed into the hands of Saddam Hussein. The glamour of their bindings reminds me a little of King George’s Library at the British Library. But conspicuous amongst them are a much tattier pile of books lying on their sides, in clear need of rebinding and conservation. These are an important national collection too but had been long neglected because they are written in Hebrew, not Arabic. It’s Saad’s mission to safeguard all of Iraq’s written heritage, whatever its origins.

FULL ARTICLE