Moosa, Ebrahim. 2012, “Translating Neuroethics: Reflections from Muslim Ethics.” Science and Engineering Ethics no. 18 (2):1-10. doi: 10.1007/s11948-012-9392-5   

Abstract 

Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included.   Continue reading

ISLAMiCommentaryDURHAM, N.C. — Protests in the Middle East, conflict in Syria, Muslim voters in the upcoming U.S. elections and other diverse topics involving Islam and the Muslim experience are the focus of a new website where scholars from leading universities have begun sharing their perspectives and research.

ISLAMiCommentary aims to inform public knowledge and discourse about the diversity of thought and cultures within Islam and Muslim communities, including those in the United States. Continue reading

by MOHAMMAD TALIB  for (OXFORD) JOURNAL OF ISLAMIC STUDIES on SEPTEMBER 22, 2012: 

(Article reviews Rethinking Islamic Studies: From Orientalism to Cosmopolitanism (University of South Carolina Press, May 30, 2010), edited by Carl Ernst and Richard Martin, with afterword by Bruce Lawrence)

The editors’ Introduction has a subtitle evocative of the main thrust of the book: Towards a Post-Orientalist Approach to Islamic Religious Studies. The study of Islam, it is pointed out, lay between Orientalism and area studies on the one hand, and religious studies on the other. The volume intends to show how historians of religion specializing in Islam are pursuing Islamic studies within newer theoretical frameworks, such as critical theory and cosmopolitanism.

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by LAURENCE HELFER for the EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF INTERNATIONAL LAW REFLECTIONS (Vol 1. Issue 1) in JUNE 2012: 

More than a month has passed since the conclusion of the high-level conference on the future of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) held at Brighton, England—the third such gathering devoted to overhauling the Strasbourg supervisory system in response to the crushing backlog of pending applications and the structural human rights problems that are their root cause.  Unlike the conferences in Interlaken and Izmir, however, the delegates in Brighton gathered under a cloud of vociferous protests against the Court by the public and government officials in the United Kingdom.  According to a 2011 poll, a majority of voters believe that the UK government should withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights—a view likely stoked by incendiary statements such as Prime Minister David Cameron’s exclamation that implementing an ECtHR judgment recognizing prisoners’ right to vote “makes me feel sick.” FULL ARTICLE

 

Related

Helfer addresses evolution of international human rights law at U.N. and before high court judges from the U.S. and Europe (Duke Law News, Duke University Law School, September 20, 2012) 

 

SEPTEMBER 20, 2012:

Islamic Art is getting its own department at the Louvre in Paris, France, and a science exhibition — “1001 Inventions: Discover the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization” —  is now on display at the National Geographic Museum in Washington, DC. Continue reading