What seems like common sense isn’t common practice, says Rowena Murray who shares her top tips for getting published      

by ROWENA MURRAY for THE GUARDIAN on SEPTEMBER 6, 2013:  

1) Have a strategy, make a plan

Why do you want to write for journals? What is your purpose? Are you writing for research assessment? Or to make a difference? Are you writing to have an impact factor or to have an impact? Do you want to develop a profile in a specific area? Will this determine which journals you write for? Have you taken their impact factors into account? Continue reading

by GARY WOOD and TURGUL KESKIN for  SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM LIST and SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM JOURNAL (BRILL) on AUGUST 29, 2013:

The Sociology of Islam Journal (https://www.brill.com/publications/journals/sociology-islam) invites article submissions.

We are delighted to announce the founding of the peer-reviewed, academic journal, the Sociology of Islam (SOI) to be published by Brill which will include four issues per year beginning in the Spring of 2013. Since Max Weber’s groundbreaking research on the sociology of religion, sociologists have grappled with aspects of religion both at the theoretical and empirical levels. While an increasing number of social scientists, particularly in recent decades, have employed innovative sociological frameworks for the study of Islam and Muslim Societies, this promising sub-discipline has so far lacked its own academic journal. The Sociology of Islam is intended to bridge this gap by functioning as an academic forum for the publication of innovative contributions to the study of Islam and Muslim societies. We welcome article contributions that address theoretical and empirical dimensions of the sociology of Islam and Muslim societies.

You can find submission guidelines and submit your article using the following website: https://www.editorialmanager.com/soi/default.asp

Contacts: Tugrul Keskin or Gary Wood

Editor Email: [email protected]

Book Review editors: 

Mustafa Gurbuz ([email protected]) and

Joshua D. Hendrick ([email protected]

by AUDRA MITCHELL for IMPACT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES (BLOG/LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE) on JUNE 24, 2013: 

A recent conference panel explored the challenges and risks associated with being a female public intellectual given widespread online sexual harassment. Audra Mitchell summarises the panel and provides further insight into what can be done to stop the abuse. Universities, funding councils and other academic bodies need to play a more supportive role in addressing the bullying and think carefully about making an individual online presence a necessity for academic success.  Continue reading

by EDWARD E. CURTIS IV for PRACTICAL MATTERS JOURNAL (ISSUE 5), SPRING 2012: 

I have been a professor of religious studies since 2000. So, for most of my career, I have taught about religion in time of war. My teaching, both inside the classroom and out, has been shaped, even constrained by the fact that my own country is responsible for much of the war-making. U.S. military interventions have resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands in Iraq and Afghanistan.1 I feel a deep personal connection to and a professional stake in the places and people against which my own government has waged war. I feel the costs of war at home, too. The USA PATRIOT Act, extraordinary rendition, the reclassification of U.S. citizens as enemy combatants, and aggressive counter-intelligence have made me afraid of my own government—and even more afraid for people who look like me but have foreign accents and Muslim-sounding names.  Continue reading

by CARL ERNST  [forthcoming in MIDDLE EAST STUDIES ASSOCIATION BULLETIN]

Everyone knows that the work of scholars in America is often considered to be irrelevant to the real issues of life. According to the mild anti-intellectualism that seems to be an endemic feature of American culture, anything that is “academic” is automatically impractical, complex, and impenetrable – in short, it is bad. This is a little hard for professors to live with; no one likes being called a pointy-headed intellectual or an egghead. The very skills and specializations that are the keys to academic success can be seen by the public as defects that remove scholars from the sphere of ordinary existence and disqualify their pronouncements. READ MORE

Carl Ernst, UNC Chapel Hill Professor of Religious Studies, is a specialist in Islamic studies, with a focus on West and South Asia. He is co-director with Professor of Sociology Charles Kurzman of UNC Chapel Hill’s Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.