by GRETCHEN PETERS for COMBATING TERRORISM CENTER at WEST POINT on JULY 31, 2012:

The CTC’s latest report leverages captured battlefield material and the insights of local community members in Afghanistan and Pakistan to outline the financial architecture that sustains the Haqqani faction of the Afghan insurgency.  The Haqqani network is widely recognized as a semi-autonomous component of the Taliban and as the deadliest and most globally focused faction of that latter group.  What receives far less attention is the fact that the Haqqani network also appears to be the most sophisticated and diversified from a financial standpoint. FULL REPORT

by MUQTEDAR KHAN for INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL POLICY AND UNDERSTANDING on MAY 25, 2012:

These days, all paths in the Arab world lead to Islamism. The electoral success the moderate Islamist Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi Al-Noor Party in Egypt, of the Justice and Development party (PJD) in Morocco, and of Al-Nahda in Tunisia confirms what has long been suspected: If and when democracy finally comes to the Middle East, Islamism will triumph because it is the only game in town. The Islamists are strong, well organized, politically popular, and willing to privilege pragmatism over ideology. Both the PJD and Al-Nahda are Islamist-leaning parties, but both have vociferously insisted that they believe in democracy, are willing and even eager to share power with the secularists, and are more focused on good governance than ideological and symbolic gestures. This moderation is a key ingredient of their success. FULL REPORT

by ROBIN WRIGHT (WILSON CENTER, U.S. INSTITUTE OF PEACE), APRIL 2012:

The Islamists are not only coming. In several countries, they’ve already arrived. Others are primed to take prominent roles down the road. Altogether, Islamist movements are today the most dynamic political force across the Arab world—and they may well be for the next decade or longer. INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER CONTINUED, PLUS FULL CHAPTERS ON EGYPT, TUNISIA, LIBYA, ALGERIA, SYRIA, PALESTINE, MOROCCO, JORDAN, LEBANON, YEMEN, TURKEY

FEBRUARY 29, 2012:

“The scale of homegrown Muslim-American terrorism in 2011 does not appear to have corroborated the warnings issued by government officials early in the year,” says a new study by Charles Kurzman (pictured), Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and published by the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security — a project of Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and RTI International (Research Triangle Institute International).

The report, “Muslim-American Terrorism in the Decade Since 9-11,” issued on Feb. 8, 2012,  is the third annual report on Muslim American terrorism suspects and perpetrators published by the Center.

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