via DUKE-UNC ISLAMIC STUDIES GRADUATE STUDENT ORGANIZING COMMITTEE/ENCYCLOPEDIA IRANICA: 

Call for Papers, 12th Annual Duke-UNC Islamic Studies Graduate Student Workshop, 21-22 March 2015, deadline for applications: 20 Dec. 2014.

The Duke-UNC Islamic Studies Graduate Student Organizing Committee is pleased to accept abstracts for our twelfth annual workshop on “Imagining the Beautiful.” We aspire to create a forum to think through theory and method in concert with the Study of Islam broadly defined. We welcome attempts to push the limits of Islamic Studies as traditionally constituted within the academy, as well as pushing the theory of limits/limits of theory that has long ignored the value of Islamicate materials. We are particularly interested in providing a forum for those exploring and developing cutting edge research and innovative approaches to this subject from the perspective of critical theory. Possible themes for papers include but are not limited to: aesthetics & power, art & architecture, stage & screen, social media, music & performance, theology & law. Continue reading

via SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM LISTSERV on SEPTEMBER 19, 2014: 

ISLAMOPHOBIA: GENDER, SEXUALITY AND RACISM

Special Issue of the Islamophobia Studies Journal 

Islamophobia Studies Journal

Abstracts due:           October 10, 2014

Full Articles due:       March 2, 2015

This special issue of Islamophobia Studies Journal (ISJ) aims to generate and circulate new knowledge about the relationship between Islamophobia, gender, sexuality and racism.

It has been over a decade since the mediatization of events on 9-11-2001 created new forms and techniques of Islamophobia and brought along intensified scrutiny of politicized forms of Islam. Across the globe we note interactions between context-specific Islamophobia and its powerful transnational flows from elsewhere. We live in a world of increasing inter-connectedness, such that news, policies, images and practices can travel instantaneously between different sites. And in the current deepening economic crisis, we are witnessing an escalation of migration from postcolonial sites including Muslim-majority countries.

In this context gender, sexuality and race are enlisted in a variety of ways to legitimize and bolster Islamophobic discourses and practices. For instance, under the guise of saving women and queers from Arab and Muslim communities, Islamophobic colonial feminism and more recently imperialist concerns about “the status of homosexuality” has been used to legitimize invasions, occupations, war and destruction. Scholars have addressed some highly publicized examples, such as the occupation of Afghanistan that then U.S. President George W. Bush claimed, with the active support of colonial feminists, as a plan to “free” Afghan women from Afghan men. Islamophobia and Orientalism also guided the manipulation and deployment of queer sexualities in Abu Ghraib. While a plethora of examples abound, the analyses are very few. This project will shift that disconnect by providing a means to understand site-specific as well as transnational phenomena. Continue reading

by EDWARD E. CURTIS IV for BULLETIN FOR THE STUDY OF RELIGION (EQUINOX PUBLISHING BLOG) on MAY 2, 2014: 

arabic_alchemy03Editor’s note (Bulletin for the Study of Religion): This post is part of the Reflections on Islamic Studies series.

By any measure, Islamic studies is a vibrant field. In the last several decades, the number of tenure-track positions dedicated to the study of Islam as a religion and to Muslim politics and societies has expanded. New journals have appeared; book sales are good; and interest in Islamic studies has led to important public humanities projects such as the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Muslim Journeys Bookshelf.

What makes Islamic studies so dynamic? For one, its ever-expanding body of participants, who come from a number of disciplinary perspectives. The field is populated by intellectual networks rather than one identifiable set of intellectual authorities. Islamic studies finds institutional homes not only in religious studies and Near Eastern languages departments, but also in history, anthropology, sociology, political science, ethnomusicology, and art and architecture, among other academic units. Continue reading

Via SOCIOLOGY OF ISLAM LISTSERV on February 6, 2014:

The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, seeks to appoint a tenure-track or tenured professor in Persian literature and cultures. This position is OPEN RANK.  Tenure-Track and Tenured professors are welcome to apply. Continue reading

The Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources blog announced on June 28, 2012 that the Aga Khan Museum, under construction in Toronto, Canada, has made manuscripts from its collection (Qur’an, religious commentary,  books of science, philosophy , and literature (including some famous Shahnameh) available in scanned form on the following web site.