by KRISTIAN PETERSEN for NEW BOOKS IN ISLAMIC STUDIES on JUNE 2, 2016: 

Edward Said’s 1978 book, Orientalism, dramatically shifted how people think about the production of knowledge and representations of the Other. His ideas have been championed and critiqued with dozens of books expanding his work on the construction of the East in western imagination. However, very rarely have we investigated the dual move of representing the Other and self-representation from the other perspective. In his new book, Arab Occidentalism: Images of America in the Middle East (I.B.Tauris, 2015), Eid Mohamed, Assistant Professor at the Doha Institute for Graduate Studies, has undertaken this task.

With great success he offers a portrait of the shifting attitudes towards America and American Culture in the Arab imagination in the post 9/11 media landscape. He found that Arab cultural producers have a complicated relationship with America, seeing it as problematic while also often representative of their own values. Mohamed delineates how this debate unfolds in literature, cinema, and news media. In our conversation we explored the dynamics of Occidentalism through Arabic novels about Egyptians living abroad in the United States, news depictions of the 2008 shoe throwing event with President George W. Bush in Iraq, the reactions to the election of Barack Obama, the Egyptian film industry, and contemporary Arab-American literary products.

LISTEN TO INTERVIEW WITH MOHAMED

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What Do Policymakers Want from Researchers? Blogs, Elevator Pitches and Good Old Fashioned Press Mentions (Duncan Green provides short and sweet translations of some of the key findings from a recent survey looking at how US policymakers use and value international studies research. The findings point to the importance of blogging, but also to the sustained influence of traditional print media. The future of evidence-informed networks may require a more engaged look at what policymakers are actually looking for.) 

by DUNCAN GREEN for LONDON SCHOOL FOR ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE (IMPACT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES BLOG) on MARCH 11, 2014: 

Duncan Green
Duncan Green

Interesting survey of US policymakers in December’s International Studies Quarterly journal. I’m not linking to it because it’s gated, thereby excluding more or less everyone outside a traditional academic institution (open data anyone?) but here’s a draft of What Do Policymakers Want From Us?, by Paul Avey and Michael Desch. The results are as relevant to NGO advocacy people trying to influence governments as they are to scholars. Maybe more so. I’ve added my own running translation. Continue reading

by DAVID SCHANZER and COURSERA, JULY 2013:  

David Schanzer
David Schanzer

A seven-week course — 9/11 and Its Aftermath — Part I — by Associate Professor of the Practice of Public Policy David Schanzer will be offered free of charge to everyone on the Coursera platform. The course begins on September 9, 2013 and requires a 3-4 hour weekly commitment. SIGN UP

The course will explore the forces that led to the 9/11 attacks and the policies the United States adopted in response and will examine the phenomenon of modern terrorism, the development of the al Qai’da ideology, and the process by which individuals radicalize towards violence. Continue reading

by FAWAZ GERGES for The Institute for Social Policy and Understanding (ISPU), The Duke Islamic Studies Center, and ISLAMiCommentary on OCTOBER 16, 2012:

(Opening Paragraphs of the Policy Brief)

Presidential doctrines have been used to articulate America’s foreign policy and worldview since the presidency of James Monroe. However, only a few doctrines have succeeded at outlining a strategic vision of the United States’ role in international affairs. The Truman Doctrine (1947) and Eisenhower Doctrine (1957) centered on curtailing the spread of Communism and expanding America’s global influence during the Cold War. In the post–Cold War era, presidential doctrines encapsulated new strategies to meet the challenges of an unfamiliar, unipolar world and have increasingly dealt with the greater Middle East as a strategic space.  Continue reading