via JAMES TODD, HOST, “OFFICE HOURS” (DUKE UNIVERSITY), on FEBRUARY 6, 2013: 

The fabled city of Timbuktu has recently been a center of conflict between the French military and Islamic militants. Complicating the clash are tensions within Mali among the country’s ethnic groups. In a live Office Hours€ webcast interview at noon Friday, Feb. 8, Duke professor Bruce Hall will explain some of the historical and cultural context of the conflict.

Watch the interview Live HERE (Duke Today website link) or on Duke Today homepage. Post a question for Hall on Twitter using @DukeOfficeHours or the Duke Office Hours Facebook page. Continue reading

by JULIE POUCHER HARBIN, EDITOR, for ISLAMiCommentary and TIRN on DECEMBER 13, 2012:

Layla Quran (pictured) is a sophomore global studies major at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Palestinian-American who moved to the U.S. from Jerusalem when she was four-years-old.

Last Spring she had the opportunity to join the BorderWork(s) Lab at the John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI) at Duke University where she began an ambitious project — researching the root causes of sectarianism in Iraq.

BorderWork(s) is one of three humanities labs currently running at Duke University. The FHI Humanities Laboratories initiative, supported by an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant, began with the Haiti lab in 2010-11, and continued with the launch of BorderWork(s) and GreaterThanGames in the 2011-2012 academic year.

Humanities labs at Duke, which are offered as independent studies or tutorials, put into practice participatory and peer-to-peer learning through a vertically integrated group of undergraduates, graduate assistants and faculty members, and facilitate research across departments. Continue reading

via STANFORD UNIVERSITY, DECEMBER 14, 2013:

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Stanford University’s Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies, the Center for South Asia, and the Division of International and Comparative Area Studies invite applications for a one-year postdoctoral position under the general rubric “Literary Cultures of Muslim South Asia.”

Candidates must specialize in literary or cultural studies connected to a major language of South Asian Muslim literary production such as Urdu-Hindi, Persian, or Bengali. The position is open to scholars in any historical period. Disciplinary training may be in area studies (South Asia or Near East), Anthropology, Comparative Literature, History, or Religious Studies. All applicants must have completed the Ph.D. by the time of appointment on September 1, 2013. The postdoctoral fellow will teach two courses over three academic quarters related to his/her interests, pursue his/her own research, and participate in the activities of Stanford University programs and departments. Continue reading

Via THE ISLAMIC MANUSCRIPT ASSOCIATION, DECEMBER 5,2012

The Islamic Manuscript Association and Stanford University Libraries announce:
A Codicology Short Course

August 26-­30, 2013
Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
Lecturer: Adam Gacek

This course is intended to introduce scholars,students and librarians to the basics of working with Islamic manuscripts.

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by KIMBER WILLIAMS for EMORY (UNIVERSITY) REPORT on JULY 10, 2012:

What feeds anti-American sentiment in the Islamic world?

It’s a question that has grown in volume since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, generating policy debate and cultural assumptions, but few hard answers.

However, a new study by Emory political science researcher Drew Linzer and Lisa Blaydes, of Stanford University, offers fresh insight, suggesting that American animosity in the Islamic world may have more to do with the intensity of conflicting factions within local Islamic politics than individual attitudes toward American culture, policies and diplomacy. FULL ARTICLE 

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