by ROBIN WRIGHT (WILSON CENTER, U.S. INSTITUTE OF PEACE), APRIL 2012:

The Islamists are not only coming. In several countries, they’ve already arrived. Others are primed to take prominent roles down the road. Altogether, Islamist movements are today the most dynamic political force across the Arab world—and they may well be for the next decade or longer. INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER CONTINUED, PLUS FULL CHAPTERS ON EGYPT, TUNISIA, LIBYA, ALGERIA, SYRIA, PALESTINE, MOROCCO, JORDAN, LEBANON, YEMEN, TURKEY

MARCH 15, 2012: 

The Essentials of Ibadi Islam. by Valerie J. Hoffman. Syracuse University Press, 2012.

Book Description from the Publisher: 

Ibadi Islam is a distinct sect of Islam, neither Sunni nor Shi’ite, that emerged in the early Islamic period and remains active today in small pockets of North Africa and as the dominant sect of Oman. Despite its antiquity, it has often been misunderstood and remains little known. Seeking to redress this gap and to introduce this influential Islamic school to the non-Arabic-speaking world, Hoffman offers the first book-length overview of Ibadi theology published in English.

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by CHARLES KURZMAN for FOREIGN POLICY on FEBRUARY 10, 2012:

Elections in Egypt, and throughout the Arab Spring, pose a classic dilemma of political theory: Do you support democracy, even if it means sacrificing some civil rights? Or do you support rights, even if it means stifling democracy? FULL ARTICLE

Charles Kurzman is a professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of “The Missing Martyrs: Why There Are So Few Muslim Terrorists” (Oxford University Press, 2011). He is also co-director, with professor of religious studies Carl Ernst, of  UNC Chapel Hill’s Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.