by SAMER SHEHATA for THE ISLAMISTS ARE COMING: WHO THEY REALLY ARE, SPRING 2012:  

The single most powerful and prolific Islamist movement was born in Egypt, the intellectual center of the Arab world. Formed in 1928, the Muslim Brotherhood was started as a social and religious club by a twenty-two-year-old schoolteacher, who recruited six members of the Suez Canal Company. It has since become the ideological grandfather of more than eighty-five other Islamist groups in dozens of countries well beyond the Arab world. Members or supporters of its many branches now number in the tens of millions. FULL EGYPT CHAPTER

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(edited) by SAMER SHEHATA, on MAY 3, 2012:

Islamist Politics in the Middle East – Movements and Change (description by publisher):

For over three decades, Islamist politics, or political Islam, has been one of the most dynamic and contentious political forces in the Middle East. Although there is broad consensus on the importance of political Islam, there is far less agreement on its character, the reasons for Islamist’s success, the role of Islamist movements in domestic and international affairs, or what these movements portend for the future.

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by ABDESLAM MAGHRAOUI for THE ISLAMISTS ARE COMING: WHO THEY REALLY ARE (BOOK), SPRING 2012:  

In a microcosm of the Arab world’s new political spectrum, Morocco now has two rival Islamist powers—one that dominates government and the other that is a banned but popular opposition group. The monarchy, however, still has ultimate control and effective veto power over the political realm. King Mohammed VI tolerated the rise of an Islamist party partly in response to the same kind of demands for reform that have swept North Africa. But Morocco’s experiment also has unique characteristics that are separate from the Arab Spring. FULL MOROCCO CHAPTER

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by MUQTEDAR KHAN for INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL POLICY AND UNDERSTANDING on MAY 25, 2012:

These days, all paths in the Arab world lead to Islamism. The electoral success the moderate Islamist Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi Al-Noor Party in Egypt, of the Justice and Development party (PJD) in Morocco, and of Al-Nahda in Tunisia confirms what has long been suspected: If and when democracy finally comes to the Middle East, Islamism will triumph because it is the only game in town. The Islamists are strong, well organized, politically popular, and willing to privilege pragmatism over ideology. Both the PJD and Al-Nahda are Islamist-leaning parties, but both have vociferously insisted that they believe in democracy, are willing and even eager to share power with the secularists, and are more focused on good governance than ideological and symbolic gestures. This moderation is a key ingredient of their success. FULL REPORT

by ROBIN WRIGHT (WILSON CENTER, U.S. INSTITUTE OF PEACE), APRIL 2012:

The Islamists are not only coming. In several countries, they’ve already arrived. Others are primed to take prominent roles down the road. Altogether, Islamist movements are today the most dynamic political force across the Arab world—and they may well be for the next decade or longer. INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER CONTINUED, PLUS FULL CHAPTERS ON EGYPT, TUNISIA, LIBYA, ALGERIA, SYRIA, PALESTINE, MOROCCO, JORDAN, LEBANON, YEMEN, TURKEY