The Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources blog announced on June 28, 2012 that the Aga Khan Museum, under construction in Toronto, Canada, has made manuscripts from its collection (Qur’an, religious commentary,  books of science, philosophy , and literature (including some famous Shahnameh) available in scanned form on the following web site. 

by TAMIR MOUSTAFA for LAW AND SOCIAL INQUIRY, 2012 on MARCH 27, 2012:

Abstract: 

Drawing on original survey research, this study examines how lay Muslims in Malaysia understand foundational concepts in Islamic law. The survey finds a substantial disjuncture between popular legal consciousness and core epistemological commitments in Islamic legal theory. In its classic form, Islamic legal theory was marked by its commitment to pluralism and the centrality of human agency in Islamic jurisprudence. Yet in contemporary Malaysia, lay Muslims tend to understand Islamic law as being purely divine, with a single “correct” answer to any given question.

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by MARK DEREWICZ for ENDEAVORS MAGAZINE on JUNE 21, 2012:

For centuries scholars and theologians have debated the Qur’an’s confusing passages. But Carl Ernst says they’ve missed out on a key method for unlocking the book’s secrets. READ MORE.

UNC Chapel Hill Professor of Religious Studies Carl Ernst is a specialist in Islamic studies, with a focus on West and South Asia. He is co-director with Professor of Sociology Charles Kurzman of UNC Chapel Hill’s Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations. 

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by DR. BRUCE JENTLESON, DR. ANDREW EXUM, MELISSA DALTON, JOHN DANA STUSTER for the CENTER FOR NEW AMERICAN SECURITY on JUNE 6, 2012:

The upheaval that has shaken the Middle East since January 2011 has clearly demonstrated some of the faulty assumptions that have long underpinned U.S. policy in the region. In Strategic Adaptation: Toward a New U.S. Strategy in the Middle East, authors Dr. Bruce W. Jentleson (pictured), Dr. Andrew M. Exum, Melissa G. Dalton and J. Dana Stuster chart the fundamentals of a revised strategy for U.S. Middle East policy, starting with a reevaluation of U.S. interests and an assessment of the evolving strategic context.  Continue reading

Charles Kurzman and Carl W. Ernst, “Islamic Studies in U.S. Universities”, in At the Precipice: Middle East Studies and the American University, ed. Seteney Shami and Cynthia Miller-Idriss (New York: New York University Press, 2012).

Kurzman and Ernst are co-directors of UNC Chapel Hill’s Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations.  Continue reading